Seremban

HISTORY

Seremban was founded as Sungei Ujong (or Sungai Ujong), named after a river of the same name. Among the Chinese-speaking community, the town is also known as “Fu Yong” in Cantonese (“hibiscus”) or as “Fu Rong” in Mandarin.

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SOCIAL AND CULTURAL

According to the 2010 census, there are 514,909 Malaysian citizens in the administrative district of Seremban. They consist of 56.4% Bumiputera, 26.2% Chinese and 17% Indian and 0.5% others excluding non-citizens. There are an additional 41,026 non-citizens. ...Continue

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ECONOMY AND BUSINESS

Similar to other west coast cities on the peninsula, Seremban began its early life as a mining town. However, after the depletion of the initial deposits and decline of the tin mining industry, agriculture came to the rescue of the state and town economy. ...Continue

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KOPITIAM AND EATERIES

Restoran Sin Yit Sing

103, Jalan Labu Lama, Taman Ast, 70200 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

+6 012-602 0122


Ketam Nipah & Lala

46 & 47, Lorong Haruan 5/2, Oakland Commerce Square, 70300 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

+6 012-236 3213


Restoran Wadi Ar Raudhah

1, 2, Jalan Seri Rahang 1, Taman Seri Rahang, 70100 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

+6 012-962 6467

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SHOPPING

No. Shopping malls/plazas

Address & Contact

1. Palm Mall Palm Mall, Lebuhraya Seremban – Bukit Nenas, Kemayan Square, 70200 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

06-765 6073

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TOURIST ATTRACTIONS AND PLACES

No. Tourist attractions and places

Address & Contact

1. Royal Gallery Tuanku Ja’afar Jalan Taman Bunga, Taman Tasek Seremban, 70100 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

06-761 9102

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PERSONALITIES AND CELEBRITIES

HALL OF FAME

PROMINENT HOMETOWN FIGURES

Ghafar Baba (Kuala Pilah) Politician
Dzulkefly Ahmad (Rembau) Politician
Ambiga Sreenevasan Social Activist
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  • HISTORY

    Traditional houses in Seremban known as Minangkabau

    Seremban was founded as Sungei Ujong (or Sungai Ujong), named after a river of the same name. Among the Chinese-speaking community, the town is also known as “Fu Yong” in Cantonese (“hibiscus”) or as “Fu Rong” in Mandarin.

    The town came into existence with the discovery of tin ore in the 1870s like most major towns in the west coast states. The discovery of tin in a nearby area called Rasah, saw an influx of Arab, foreign Malay and Chinese immigrants to work on the mines and trade there. Most of the local Malays were farmers.

    Renamed to Seremban, the town flourished not only as a mining area but also as a business centre. The Linggi River served as the sole outlet to ferry tin and supplies in and out of the town. Revenue came not only from the tin trade but also from the large amount of taxes collected.

    The local chieftains, namely the Dato’ Kelana and the Dato’ Shahbandar of Sungai Ujong were at odds with each other on the rights to collect taxes and ownership and control of the mines. The rivalry to assert influence and authority opened the door for British intervention in Negeri Sembilan.

    The British sided with the Dato’ Kelana upon his invitation and defeated the forces of the Dato’ Bandar who was later sent into exile to Singapore. In gratitude to the British for helping him win the war, the Dato’ Kelana accepted a British Resident.

    Another version of Sungei Ujong’s origins places the birth of the settlement to the year 1773.  According to this version Sungai Ujong was named after a felling incident of an old merbau tree in Rembau.

    Subsequently the name was changed to Seremban during the British colonial rule after a traditional game known as ‘Batu Sarimban’ or ‘Batu Seremban’, often played by the Chinese community near the Seremban railway station at the time.

    What’s unique about Negeri Sembilan’s history is the role of the Orang Asli who are acknowledged as original inhabitants prior to the arrival of the Minangkabau people who brought along the Adat Perpatih from their original settlements in West Sumatra.

    As with other towns developed in the states brought under British colonial rule in the late 19th century, the new settlement took on its present urban form with the construction of road, railway lines, public buildings such as a post office, markets, schools and commercial buildings. Many of these early colonial buildings remain in use today although they have been overshadowed by the new physical development.

    Seremban was granted city status on 1st January 2020. The new title of ‘city’ for Seremban signals that this capital of Negeri Sembilan has arrived in terms of its urban development and the standard of its public infrastructure and amenities.

  • SOCIAL AND CULTURAL

    Senior woman playing traditional game with grandchildren

    According to the 2010 census, there are 514,909 Malaysian citizens in the administrative district of Seremban. They consist of 56.4% Bumiputera, 26.2% Chinese and 17% Indian and 0.5% others excluding non-citizens. There are an additional 41,026 non-citizens. Recent estimates indicate a rapid growth of the city’s population. With an annual growth rate exceeding 3% annually, current estimates place the population at over 700,000. Seremban and Nilai, the neighbouring town, account for about half of Negeri Sembilan’s population.

    The religious makeup of Seremban’s population can be deduced from the 2010 census report which found that the state’s population was made up of 60.3% Muslim, 21.2% Buddhist, 13.4% Hindu, 2.4% Christian, 1.1% of unknown affiliation, 0.8% non-religious, 0.5% Chinese religion follower or Taoist and 0.3%. followers of other religions.

    The great majority of Bumiputra Malays in the state trace their origin to the Minang people, an ethnic  group native to the Minangkabau Highlands of West Sumatra. ‘Minangkabau’ itself derives from two words — ‘menang’ (win) and ‘kerbau’ (buffalo). Hence visual representation of the buffalo horn is prevalent in Minangkabau architecture and traditional female headgear.

    The Minang community is also noted for its adherence to their customary law called Adat Perpatih which emphasizes the matrilineal tradition. Adat Perpatih allows for property to be passed on along the female line.

    The state is also unusual in terms of its royal house. Unlike the monarchy in other Malay states which are under the rule of a sultan, in Negeri Sembilan the ruler is called Yamtuan Besar or his title in full, Yang di-Pertuan Besar.

    A Yamtuan Besar is selected by a council of ruling chiefs called Undang from among leading princes belonging to four noble houses (Putera Yang Empat). This outlier practice in Negeri Sembilan is different from the standard monarchical system found in the rest of the Malay states where the law of primogeniture, i.e. the right of the eldest son to inherit prevails.

  • ECONOMY AND BUSINESS

    Palm oil plantation

    Similar to other west coast cities on the peninsula, Seremban began its early life as a mining town. However, after the depletion of the initial deposits and decline of the tin mining industry,  agriculture came to the rescue of the state and town economy.

    Today oil palm and rubber plantations and smallholdings continue to provide an economic basis. But manufacturing has emerged to become the leading economic sector in Negeri Sembilan.

    The state produces electric, electronic and optical goods as well as metal works, vehicle parts, petroleum and chemical products, paper and textile, furniture and wood, and oil and vegetable fats processing.

    Latest estimates indicate that the manufacturing sector contributes almost half of the state’s gross domestic product (GDP), followed by services and tourism (40.3%), agriculture (6%), construction (2.2%) and mining (0.3%).

    The proximity of Seremban to the national capital Kuala Lumpur has also made it a beneficiary of the ripple effects of KL’s growth especially in the housing sector. It is situated about 57km from Putrajaya and 64km from Cyberjaya respectively by road.

    The driving distance between Seremban and Kuala Lumpur is 67.5 km, and between Seremban and Nilai is 27km. Although Seremban does not have its own airport, it is actually nearer to Malaysia’s international airport KLIA than Kuala Lumpur.

    The cheaper housing in Seremban is convenient for KLites who choose to commute daily to their workplaces in Kuala Lumpur through a 40-minute drive. Aside from the expressway, Kuala Lumpur is also linked to Seremban by KTM Komuter’s electric rail service.

    Strong demand for new middle-class residential areas saw the expansion of outer Seremban with the satellite town Seremban 2 growing west of the North–South Expressway.

    Seremban 2 hosts the new district administrative offices, court complex, district police headquarters and state fire brigade headquarters.

  • KOPITIAM AND EATERIES

    The crispy buttery pastry bun filled with juicy savoury and sweet roast pork known as the Seremban siew pau

    Deservedly famous is the eponymous Seremban Pau (baked pork bun with crispy skin) and this delicacy can be easily found being sold in the town.

    Cousin to the Seremban Pau is the more unusual wet curry chicken wraparound bun. Seremban is also known for its beef noodles dish. Some food stall operators even inherited the secret recipe from their fathers and grandfathers.

    Lou Shi Fan in Seremban is slightly different because these rice noodles come in long strings unlike the more common stubby pieces one eats in KL. Hakka Mee is another Seremban speciality. Seremban Laksa is different from the Penang variety and closer to the KL curry mee.

    Seremban’s Malay cuisine is mostly the delicious Minangkabau cooking. Its creamy spicy masak lemak menu features, among others, smoked meat cooked in rendang, gulai masak lemak cili padi and gulai tempoyak pucuk ubi.

    Nasi Padang is named after the town of Padang located in Sumatra. Nasi ambeng is rice served with curry, kerisik (fried coconut flesh) and serunding (meat floss).

    In Chinese non-halal restaurants, the crab and other seafood dishes are a mouth-watering fare. Combining shopping with eating is Sungai Ujong Walk where there are dozens of outsets selling foodstuff and beverages.


    Restoran Sin Yit Sing

    No.103, Jalan Labu Lama, Taman Ast, 70200 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    +6 012-602 0122


    Ketam Nipah & Lala

    No.46 & 47, Lorong Haruan 5/2, Oakland Commerce Square, 70300 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    +6 012-236 3213


    Restoran Wadi Ar Raudhah

    No.1 & 2, Jalan Seri Rahang 1, Taman Seri Rahang, 70100 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    +6 012-962 6467


    Restoran Melido 美丽都茶餐室

    No.171, Jalan Utam Singh, Bandar Seremban, 70000 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    +6 016-675 4313


    麵九拉揸面 Kedai Makanan Dan Minuman Mian Jiu

    Lot No. 1854, Jalan Besar Lukut, Negeri Sembilan, 71010 Port Dickson

    +6 012-353 8307


    Asia Laksa House

    No.341, Jalan Berlian, Taman Senawang Jaya, 70450 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    +6 06-677 0667


    Lucky Seafood PD (Lucky King Bun)

    No.4366, 4349, Jalan Besar, Taman Port Dickson, 71010 Port Dickson, Negeri Sembilan

    +6 06-651 2392


    Yi Poh Restaurant

    No.306 Jalan Seng Meng Lee, Seremban, Malaysia

    +60 6-763 2791


    The Gift Tilapia Restaurant

    No.11, Lorong Merbok 6/1 | Taman Bunga Blossom, Seremban 70100, Malaysia

    +60 6-633 1312


    Negeri Hin Yi Restaurant

    No.2019, Lor Pelangi Satu, Taman Ria, Port Dickson 71000, Malaysia

    +60 16-926 6412


    Kedai Kopi Dan Makanan Kheng Nam Yuen

    No.557/ 42 Jalan Seroja 21, Taman Yoon Fook (Seremban Garden) , 70450 Negeri Sembilan

    +6 06-761 5303


    Sum Foong Ann Kedai Kopi Dan Makanan

    Lot 1786/4 Jalan Sikamat, 70400 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    +6 06-763 2066


    Restoran Yl Sin

    No.104, Jalan Merak 11, Taman Thivy Jaya, 70300 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    +6 013-931 9531


    Restoran Chai Hong

    No. 50 Jalan Kapitan Tam Yeong, 70100 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    +6 06-762 4357


    Lato Restaurant

    No.173, Jalan Temiang, 70200 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    +6 012-611 2343

  • SHOPPING

    No. Shopping malls/plazas

    Address & Contact

    1. Palm Mall Palm Mall, Lebuhraya Seremban – Bukit Nenas, Kemayan Square, 70200 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    06-765 6073

    2. Terminal One Mall Jalan Lintang, Bandar Seremban, 70000 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    06-767 3194

    3. Seremban Prima Seremban Prima, Jalan Dato Bandar Tunggal, Bandar Seremban, 70000 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    06-764 8282

    4. Angsana Seremban G24 Ground Floor, Angsana Ipoh Mall, Jalan Hospital, Ipoh, Perak 30450 Ipoh, Perak

    05-242 2370

    5. AEON MALL Seremban 2 112, Persiaran S2 B1, Seremban 2, 70300 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    1-300-80-2366

    6. Angsana Seremban Lot L1 26,Tkt 1, UTC Negeri Sembilan @ Angsana Seremban, Jalan Kuala Pilah, 70400 Seremban (City)

    06-760 9900

    7. Centerpoint Seremban 33, Jalan Dato Siamang Gagap, Betaria Business Centre, 70100 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    06-763 9889

    8. Kompleks PKNNS, Seremban 2 104, Persiaran S2 B1, Seremban 2, 70300 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    06-762 3251

    9. Era Square Terminal 2, Jalan Labu Lama, 70200 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    014-900 2750

    10. Pavilion Square Seremban A-104, Persiaran S2 B1, Seremban 2, 70300 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    010-898 9200

    11. KIP MALL Senawang Taman Seri Paroi, 70400 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    019-656 9518

  • TOURIST ATTRACTIONS AND PLACES

    Former State Secretariat Building Seremban

    Negeri Sembilan is famous for its trademark Minangkabau roof resembling a pair of buffalo horns. Many buildings in Seremban display this unique feature, including the Wisma Negeri state secretariat building and the Seremban municipal council hall.

    As with typical Malay wooden architecture, there is beautifully carved lattice that decorate the ceiling. Both buffalo roof and lattice can be seen in a cultural complex which has three buildings — the former royal palace Istana Ampang Tinggi, the Negeri Sembilan House and what has been converted to serve as the State Museum.

    Sze Koon Temple is located on a hillock, Bukit Termiang, and accessible through a series of steps. Due to the abundance of centipedes on its grounds, this 150-year-old house of worship is known as Centipede Temple. In addition to the real creepy crawlies, there is also a scary-looking sculpture of a giant centipede.

    Centipede Temple has a three-storey pagoda, statues of Buddha and Kuan Yin (at 30-feet, this statue could well be the tallest of its kind in the country) as well as statues of Taoist deities such as the Eight Immortals.

    Seremban’s Church of the Visitation is an iconic 120-year old Catholic church with colourful stained glass windows and genuine wooden pews inside. The city’s Wesley Methodist Church is 105 years old and looks like an archetypal Protestant church in design.

    The 120-year old Masjid Jamek in Seremban does not have the ubiquitous onion dome but instead a pyramid shaped two-tiered roof. Nearby on Jalan Yam Tuan there is the intricately carved 125-year old Sri Bala Thandayuthapani Hindu temple. Galeri Diraja Tuanku Ja’afar is a modern building functioning as a royal gallery open to the public.

    The landmark Seremban Square is centred right in the heart of the town. At night this square is lit by beautiful decorative lights. Handicraft Centre is housed in a colonial building that used to be the residence of the British advisor to the Yamtuan during the time of British rule in the early 1900s. The centre sells traditional crafts which make lovely souvenirs or gifts.

    Ostrich Farm not only shows ostriches but smaller birds such as turkeys and geese. Lake Garden is the recreational park in Seremban popular with weekend visitors. Among its highlights is the orchid conservatory. This Lake Garden is overlooked by the city’s modern State Mosque.

    For those who prefer more than a sightseeing day trip, there are many homestays in the outskirts of Seremban where one can sleep overnight. Homestays are a hit with those interested in activities like jungle trekking and visiting the many eco parks.

     

    No.

    Tourist attractions and places

    Address & Contact

    1. Royal Gallery Tuanku Ja’afar Jalan Taman Bunga, Taman Tasek Seremban, 70100 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    06-761 9102

    2. Jelita Ostrich Farm Address: Lot 1504, Batu 6 Mukim Pantai, Jalan Jelebu, 71770 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    06-767 0707

    3. Minangkabau State Museum/Complex Centre Address: Jalan Sungai Ujong, Lebuhraya Seremban – Bukit Nenas, 70200 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    06-763 1149

    4. Negeri Sembilan State Mosque Jalan Dato Hamzah, Seremban, 70000 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    06-763 9354

    5. S2 City Park 70300 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    017-631 6549

    6. Dataran Seremban Bandar Seremban, 70000 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    018-237 3562

    7. The Church of The Visitation Address: 85A, Jalan Yam Tuan, Bandar Seremban, 70000 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    06-762 4468

    8. Centipede Temple Jalan Temiang, 70200, Seremban, Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia, 70200 Seremban

    010-310 5880

    9. Rasah Mariamman Temple Seremban Bukit Rasah, 70300 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    06-762 4502

    10. Kepayang Hill Temple Kanni Kovil Taman Bukit Kepayang, 70200 Seremban, Negeri Sembilan

    019-620 9259

  • PERSONALITIES AND CELEBRITIES

    PROMINENT HOMETOWN FIGURES

    Ghafar Baba (Kuala Pilah) Politician
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    Sheikh Ali Hockey Player
    Fong Chan Onn Politician
    Lee Hong Susan Lim Parasitologist
    Loke Siew Fook Politician
    Khairy Jamaludin Politician
    Punch Gunalan Badminton Player
    Anthony Loke Politician
    Ginder Singh Gill Businessman
    Peter van Huizen Hockey Player
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